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AvMC team travels to Fort Campbell to gain insight, build esprit de corps

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Alabama. (June 19, 2019) – Members of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Aviation & Missile Center recently traveled to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, to gain better insight into how the center’s mission supports the Army as part of professional development.

The professional development opportunity was led by AvMC Chief of Staff Steven J. Fisher designed to help members of the organization better understand the Warrior Ethos and foster relationships among the staff.

Fisher, a veteran, organized the trip to highlight aviation-specific work at Fort Campbell, leadership roles in the Army, and the sacrifices made by Soldiers.

“Our organization provides direct support to the Army’s aviation and missile communities, but few of our employees have ever worn the uniform,” he said. “This trip allows the staff to see firsthand why the work we do is so critical, and helps connect their work directly to the Army’s mission.”

The two-day visit included demonstrations at the Allison Aquatic Survival Training Facility, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, and of improvised explosive device training and robotics at the home station training compound.

The team had opportunities to eat lunch at an Army dining facility, engage with aviators and crewmembers of the 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), have a leadership discussion with a senior non-commissioned officer, and represented AvMC at the annual 160th SOAR(A) Nightstalker memorial.

For many participants, the visit to the third-largest Army installation in the world was their first such experience. “This was my first trip to a bona fide Army base like Fort Campbell and I was blown away by the experience,” said Davis Manning, a program analyst with the AvMC’ s information technology office. “For years now, I have supported Army organizations in a number of capacities and it was nice to see firsthand how the work we do impacts the Soldier either directly or indirectly.”

Stephen Jalbert, a software engineer currently serving as the CCDC AvMC executive director’s executive officer, said he was excited to be able to see and touch an Apache helicopter because it provided insight into the work he does at the center.

“As a software safety engineer for the Hellfire variants, one way of mitigating hazards involves the user interface through notifications and inhibits. Having any insight into what the pilot sees and experiences was challenging at times, as that information was managed by a separate program office,” Jalbert said after climbing down from the Apache cockpit. “Even in a powered off state it was interesting to get some idea of what a pilot would be seeing from their perspective. That is something that I would have never really had the opportunity to see while I was supporting that project.”

For some attendees, the annual Nightstalker memorial served as a stark reminder of the sacrifices made by American Soldiers.

“The memorial was one of the highlights of the trip and really drove home the intent of understanding the ultimate sacrifice made by many in the armed forces,” Manning said. “I came away with a greater appreciation for all men and women in uniform and am proud to do my small part in supporting them.”

Fisher said he plans to hold similar professional development opportunities in the future to continue to emphasize AvMC’s critical role in the readiness and modernization of the Army.

The CCDC Aviation & Missile Center, formerly known as the Aviation & Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), is part of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command, which conducts responsive research, development and life cycle engineering to deliver the aviation and missile capabilities the Army depends on to ensure victory on the battlefield today and tomorrow. Through collaboration across the command’s core technical competencies, CCDC leads in the discovery, development and delivery of the technology-based capabilities required to make Soldiers more lethal to win our Nation’s wars and come home safely. CCDC is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Futures Command.

DISCLAIMER: This article was originally published at the Defense Video Imagery Distribution System Hub (www.didvshub.net). The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement.

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